Fluid Site Specific Browser

Are you a Gmail, Facebook, Campfire or (Insert Your Favorite Webapp Here) fanatic? Do you have 20 or more browser tabs open at all times? Are you tired of some random site or Flash ad crashing your browser and causing you to lose your (say) Google Spreadsheets data in another tab? If so, Todd Ditchendorf […]

Are you a Gmail, Facebook, Campfire or (Insert Your Favorite Webapp Here) fanatic? Do you have 20 or more browser tabs open at all times? Are you tired of some random site or Flash ad crashing your browser and causing you to lose your (say) Google Spreadsheets data in another tab?

If so, Todd Ditchendorf has released Fluid, a Site Specific Browser that allows you to ditch the 30 tabbed browser, and run web applications in the own world (icon etc):

Fluid 0.4 includes Dock badges and Dock menus for Gmail, Google Reader, and Yahoo! Mail, auto-software updates via the Sparkle Update framework, custom SSB installation paths, and custom SSB icons.

And, how cool is this... a Flickr group for shared Fluid SSB icons!

How does it work? Fluid itself is a very small application. When launched, Fluid displays a small window where you specify the URL of a webapp you'd like to run in a Site Specific Browser. Provide an application name, click 'Create' and you'll be prompted to launch the new native Mac app you've just created.

Use Fluid to run YouTube, GTalk, Flickr, Basecamp, Delicious, .Mac webmail, or any other webapp as a separate Mac desktop application.

What makes Fluid different from Prism? Fluid is very similar in nature to Prism, but is based on Safari’s WebKit rendering engine. And SSBs created by Fluid are true, native Cocoa OS X applications offering seamless integration into the Mac OS.

Fluid 0.4 Beta | Fluid

Fluid, Browser, Web Browser, SSB, Site Specific Browser, Beta, Internet Video, YouTube