Windows Server 2008 "Remote Administration changes"

This article describes the differences between Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2008 when you use the Remote Desktop Connection (RDC) client to remotely connect to the server for administrative purposes.   In Windows Server 2003, you can start the RDC client (mstsc.exe) with the /console switch to remotely connect to the physical console session on the server […]

This article describes the differences between Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2008 when you use the Remote Desktop Connection (RDC) client to remotely connect to the server for administrative purposes.

 

In Windows Server 2003, you can start the RDC client (mstsc.exe) with the /console switch to remotely connect to the physical console session on the server (also known as session 0). In Windows Server 2008, the /console switch has been deprecated. (For more information, see the “Why the /console switch is no longer needed” section of this article.) In Windows Server 2008, session 0 is a non-interactive session that is reserved for services.

 

You can use the new /admin switch to remotely connect to a Windows Server 2008-based server for administrative purposes. The /admin switch is introduced with RDC 6.1. RDC 6.1 is included with the following operating systems:

       Windows Server 2008

       Windows Vista Service Pack 1 (SP1) Beta and RC

       Windows XP Service Pack 3 (SP3) Beta and RC

 

Note   RDC 6.1 (6.0.6001) supports Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) 6.1.

 

RDC 6.1 does not support the /console switch. However, for backward compatibility, you can use the /admin switch to connect to the physical console session on a Windows Server 2003-based server. For example, to connect from a Windows Vista SP1 RC-based client to the physical console session of a Windows Server 2003-based server, you can run the command mstsc.exe /admin.

 

If you try to use the /console switch with the RDC 6.1 client, the behavior is as follows.

 

 

Scenario

Behavior

You type mstsc.exe /console at the command prompt, and then connect to a remote server that does not have Terminal Server installed.

The /console switch is silently ignored. You will be connected to a session to remotely administer the server.

 

(For more information about the Windows Server 2008 behavior, see the “Behavior when you connect to a server that does not have Terminal Server installed” section of this article.)

You type mstsc.exe /console at the command prompt, and then connect to a remote server that has Terminal Server installed.

The /console switch is silently ignored. You will be connected to a standard Remote Desktop session that requires a Terminal Services client access license (TS CAL).

In the RDC client UI, you specify Computer_name /console in the Computer box (where Computer_name represents the name of the remote computer to which you want to connect), and then click Connect.

You receive the following error message:

 

“An unknown parameter was specified in computer name field.”

In the .rdp file, you specify /console in the “full address” property, and then try to start the Remote Desktop connection.

You receive the following error message:

 

“An unknown parameter was specified in computer name field.”

In the .rdp file, you specify the “connect to console” property, and then start the Remote Desktop connection.

The property is silently ignored. You will be connected to a session that requires a TS CAL.

As a developer, you programmatically call the put_ConnectToServerConsole function or the get_ConnectToServerConsole function of the IMsRdpClientAdvancedSettings interface.

The function fails, and returns S_FALSE.

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Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, Longhron, Hyper-V, RDC, Remote Administration, Features, Microsoft