Microsoft Dryad Project

Concurrent programming is demanding. While part of a program is modifying data, the other parts must be prevented from doing likewise. Manually organizing such tasks is challenging for the most adept experts. People have been trying for decades to make it easier.Concurrent programming is in demand. More programs are communicating with Web services. Fundamental limitations […]

Concurrent programming is demanding. While part of a program is modifying data, the other parts must be prevented from doing likewise. Manually organizing such tasks is challenging for the most adept experts. People have been trying for decades to make it easier.

Concurrent programming is in demand. More programs are communicating with Web services. Fundamental limitations in physics are dictating a move to multicore chips that enable many processes to run in parallel. There’s no turning back.

Enter Dryad.

“The Dryad project,” says Michael Isard, senior researcher for Microsoft Research Silicon Valley, “is trying to make it easier to write programs that can run over very large collections of computers, both efficiently and reliably.”

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Dryad, Microsoft Project, Microsoft Research, Programming, Datacenter