Windows Vista graded as "not meeting expectations"

If Microsoft Corp.'s Windows Vista were graded for its first year, the report card would read "not meeting expectations," analysts said Friday, a year and a day after the operating system code went gold and was sent off for duplication.On Nov. 8, 2006, Jim Allchin, then the head of Vista development, announced that Vista had […]

If Microsoft Corp.'s Windows Vista were graded for its first year, the report card would read "not meeting expectations," analysts said Friday, a year and a day after the operating system code went gold and was sent off for duplication.

On Nov. 8, 2006, Jim Allchin, then the head of Vista development, announced that Vista had gone RTM (release to manufacturing) -- the first step toward its release later in the month to businesses, and in late January 2007 to consumers. "This is a good day. I am super happy," Allchin told reporters in a conference call.

While Vista might be a sales blockbuster -- Microsoft's last quarter broke eight-year-old records, in large part behind Vista -- it hasn't made the kind of progress anticipated in the enterprise world. And if Allchin, who retired as soon as Vista shipped in January, was still with Microsoft, he might not be super happy now.

"The uptake is much lower than expected," said Michael Silver, an analyst with Gartner Inc. "Organizations really seem to be way behind where they said they would be last year." Silver compared the results of a Gartner survey last month on Vista adoption plans with an identical survey taken in October 2006, and concluded that enterprises are 9-12 months behind their original expectations.

Full Article

Windows Vista, Microsoft