Virtualizing Mac OS X!

When we talk about virtualization on the Apple Mac platform, we are usually talking about virtualizing Microsoft Windows or Linux operating systems as guest operating systems on either VMware Fusion or Parallels' Desktop for Mac products. But in this case, we are actually talking about virtualizing the Mac OS itself. Is this a Halloween trick? […]

When we talk about virtualization on the Apple Mac platform, we are usually talking about virtualizing Microsoft Windows or Linux operating systems as guest operating systems on either VMware Fusion or Parallels' Desktop for Mac products. But in this case, we are actually talking about virtualizing the Mac OS itself.

Is this a Halloween trick? Or treat? I suppose it depends on the way you look at it. The good news, however, is that there is definitely change in the air.

If you remember the long, drawn out discussions in the past, the idea of virtualizing Mac OS X was clear. Apple stated that the license only allowed you to install and use one copy of the Mac OS X Server software on a single Apple-labeled computer at a time. So it was a one license, one machine EULA. Which pretty much ruled it out as a guest operating system even though both VMware and Parallels said it was "possible" to virtualize the OS.

Now, it looks as though a subtle change has been made to Apple's End User License Agreement (EULA) in the new Leopard Server operating system. It reads[...]

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Virtualization, Mac OS X