Microsoft Windows Vista vs. Windows XP "SLI Under The Microscope"

Upon its release, it was expected that even the most ardent power users and enthusiasts were going to tread lightly at first with respect to adopting Windows Vista as their primary OS. Though end users in this demographic are classically early adopters, in terms of new hardware technologies coming to market, an operating system change […]

Upon its release, it was expected that even the most ardent power users and enthusiasts were going to tread lightly at first with respect to adopting Windows Vista as their primary OS. Though end users in this demographic are classically early adopters, in terms of new hardware technologies coming to market, an operating system change brings with it a whole myriad of pitfalls, from backwards compatibility to stability and performance issues, which are all understood to be "part of the deal" with any new OS. In reality, many folks migrate to a new OS platform over time, opting to dip their toe carefully into the pool with less critical usage models, like running it on a backup machine or secondary notebook, for example, at least initially.

Gamers, on the other hand, are perhaps a breed apart, in that many are risk takers, (should we say thrill-seekers maybe?) willing to take it on the chin with their gaming rig in an effort to have the latest and greatest in both hardware and software technologies. In short, a risky new OS move to Vista is especially tempting for gamers, with the advent of DirectX 10, which is only supported by Microsoft's new OS.

However, our early findings were mixed with respect to Vista's gaming performance and certainly with a few games that had a DX10 rendering mode, performance just wasn't up to par with Windows XP, which has years of ring-out and performance optimization behind it. This all seemed logical but the view with Vista was even more bleak if you were running a pair of NVIDIA graphics cards in SLI mode. Performance in Vista on this type of system, in either DX9 or DX10 mode just wasn't where it needed to be.

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Microsoft, Windows Vista, Windows XP, GPUs, SLI