Organic dyes developed to cut cost of recordable Blu-ray

Pioneer and Mitsubishi has developed an organic dye method for creating recordable Blu-ray (BD-R) discs that will significantly cut the cost of making the high-definition media. The two companies' joint research project deployed LTH (low to high) technology to create the write-once recordable discs for data storage. There will be cost savings because the new […]

Pioneer and Mitsubishi has developed an organic dye method for creating recordable Blu-ray (BD-R) discs that will significantly cut the cost of making the high-definition media.

The two companies' joint research project deployed LTH (low to high) technology to create the write-once recordable discs for data storage.

There will be cost savings because the new discs can be manufactured on modified CD and DVD production lines. Previously BD-R discs could only be made using using inorganic dyes that required completely new manufacturing facilities.

On the downside, existing BD-R drives cannot read the new discs, though it is hoped it may be possible to address this with a firmware update.

The first dedicated LTH BD drives are expected to be on the market in the first half of 2008; a Pioneer prototype (pictured) can currently burn 25GB discs at 1x and 2x, but 4x is planned and 6x hoped for.

Pioneer, Mitsubishi, Organic Dyes, Blu-ray, Blu-ray Disc, Costs & Savings

Source:? PC Pro