Microsoft and it's secret desktop plan

IBM's announcement of Lotus Symphony yesterday gave me a wicked '80s flashback. In my mind's eye I saw the original Lotus Symphony office suite, flickering on an amber monochrome monitor, boring me to tears as a New Order dance track thumped in the background. The new Symphony comes with a different soundtrack: the drumbeat of […]

softgrid microsoft desktop-virtualization virtualization google google-apps zoho zimbra ibm lotus symphonyIBM's announcement of Lotus Symphony yesterday gave me a wicked '80s flashback. In my mind's eye I saw the original Lotus Symphony office suite, flickering on an amber monochrome monitor, boring me to tears as a New Order dance track thumped in the background.

The new Symphony comes with a different soundtrack: the drumbeat of challengers marching on Microsoft Office. The Symphony suite unveiled by IBM yesterday as a free download is actually a gussied-up version of OpenOffice, the open source productivity suite –- kinda like Sun's StarOffice,now offered for free as part of Google Pack. Could it be a coincidence that on the same day Google CEO Eric Schmidt talked up the forthcoming presentation component of Google Docs?

So let's see: We have OpenOffice permutations advancing on the desktop plus Google Apps, Zoho, Zimbra, and several other contenders making a flank attack through the browser. ODF, OpenOffice's native document format, continues to gather steam, while earlier this month the ISO voted against fast-tracking approval of Microsoft's competing OOXML document format. Not to mention that the Office clones look and feel more like earlier versions of Office than Microsoft's 2007 version and its revamped UI.

Yet in Redmond the guns remain eerily silent, to the point where I'm beginning to wonder if Microsoft isn't up to something. Ask the company, and all you get is the usual defensive posturing. Yesterday I spoke with Jacob Jaffe, Director, Microsoft Office, who –- surprise! –- claimed the recent surge of competitive activity doesn't bother Microsoft at all. Not one bit! Customer satisfaction is booming. The company sold more than 71 million licenses in the last fiscal year, for heaven's sake.

You want SaaS (software-as-a-service), a la Google apps? Microsoft goes one better: software plus services. As an example, Jaffe noted you can call up help within an Office application and get helpful content from Microsoft via Office Online. Whoa! Nobody could have imagined that back in the Devo era.

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Microsoft, IBM, Lotus Notes, Domino, Lotus Symphony, Google, Google Docs, OpenOffice, Google Apps, Zoho, Zimbra, ODF, Microsoft Office, Microsoft Desktop