David Maynor publishes Apple Wi-Fi exploit details

More than a year after claiming to have found a way to take over a Macintosh computer using a flaw in the system's wireless card, David Maynor has published details of his exploit. The details were included in a paper published in the September issue of Uninformed.org, an online hacking magazine. The lengthy paper describes […]

More than a year after claiming to have found a way to take over a Macintosh computer using a flaw in the system's wireless card, David Maynor has published details of his exploit.

The details were included in a paper published in the September issue of Uninformed.org, an online hacking magazine. The lengthy paper describes how to run unauthorized software on a Macintosh by taking advantage of a flaw in Apple's AirPort wireless drivers.

Apple patched the bug in September 21 without crediting Maynor for discovering the problem. Instead, Apple's engineers found the bug during an internal audit, the company said.

Maynor and researcher Jon Ellch first described this type of problem during an August 2006 presentation at the Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas. He was widely criticized by the Apple community for failing to back up his claims with technical details and for presenting a video demonstration that used a third-party wireless card instead of the one that ships with the Mac.

On Tuesday, Maynor said that at the time of the Black Hat demonstration, he had found similar wireless bugs in a number of wireless cards, including Apple's AirPort and that he had been told to use the third-party card in the video because it was deemed "the least offensive to people."

So why publish the Mac hack now?

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Apple, Macintosh, Mac, Mac OS X, Wi-Fi, WiFi, Vulnerability, Exploit, David Maynor, Apple AirPort, Wireless