Mainsoft Enables .Net And Java Environments Interoperability

Mainsoft, which specializes in .Net and Java interoperability, is helping organizations integrate their .Net-based environments with popular Java-based technologies such as IBM's WebSphere. Mainsoft is announcing Aug. 6 that its software is enabling the Belgian University Hospital Ghent (UZ Gent), based in Gent, Belgium, to deploy IBM's WebSphere Portal solution despite being a .Net development […]

Mainsoft, which specializes in .Net and Java interoperability, is helping organizations integrate their .Net-based environments with popular Java-based technologies such as IBM's WebSphere.

Mainsoft is announcing Aug. 6 that its software is enabling the Belgian University Hospital Ghent (UZ Gent), based in Gent, Belgium, to deploy IBM's WebSphere Portal solution despite being a .Net development shop.

UZ Gent has chosen IBM WebSphere Portal Version 6.0 to develop a self-service virtual information center for its 5,000 staff members, students, health care professionals, and more than 380,000 patients and their families who visit the hospital each year, said Bart Sijnave, CIO of UZ Gent.

Using the .Net-Java interoperability software from Mainsoft, UZ Gent's .Net development team will use the Visual Studio 2005 development environment to integrate its existing .Net application framework, 15 strategic .Net applications, more than 5 terabytes of data stored in an Oracle database and an LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) repository into a WebSphere Portal environment running under Linux, Sijnave said.

Rather than rewriting the .Net code in Java, Mainsoft for Java EE Portal Edition will enable UZ Gent's enterprise development team to cross-compile .Net-based code into Java executables that run locally on WebSphere Portal, Sijnave said.

"One of the most specific points is that although we have a team of developers doing .Net, we chose IBM WebSphere as our portal solution," Sijnave said. "We wanted a portal and Microsoft SharePoint would have been the logical solution, but the IBM solution was much better for us. But that left us with a dilemma."

Sijnave said the hospital had to migrate to a standard platform, "so we chose to 'uniformize' our development team. We said it was going to be either .Net or Java; we chose .Net." he said. The hospital's head of development was skeptical about whether the Mainsoft solution would work, "but it turned out to be very successful."

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Mainsoft, .NET, Java, IBM, WebSphere, IBM WebSphere Portal, Hatrogenous, Interoperability