Microsoft specific product revenues

This might have gotten lost amid the flood of data yesterday at Microsoft's annual meeting with financial analysts, but some particularly revealing numbers emerged during a presentation by Chris Liddell, chief financial officer. Here's the slide: Why it's notable: Microsoft typically discloses its quarterly revenues and profits by division, not product. While the company refers […]

This might have gotten lost amid the flood of data yesterday at Microsoft's annual meeting with financial analysts, but some particularly revealing numbers emerged during a presentation by Chris Liddell, chief financial officer. Here's the slide:

Why it's notable: Microsoft typically discloses its quarterly revenues and profits by division, not product. While the company refers generally to product performance, it's unusual to see these kinds of specific product revenue figures made public.

So, for example, this slide shows that the Xbox business, at $4.1 billion in annual revenue, makes up about 67 percent of the $6.1 billion in revenue across the Entertainment and Devices division. Windows Server is responsible for about 40 percent of the Server & Tools Division's $11.2 billion in revenue, and so on.

Liddell showed the numbers for a different reason -- to make a case that Microsoft's investments in new products have paid off. From the transcript:

"Go back 10 years and think about the Server and Tools business, which wasn't in existence to any great extent there, which is now one of our fundamentally biggest and most valuable businesses," he said. "But then look more recently on some of the businesses that we've created or driven from essentially virtually no amount of revenue to relatively significant over the last five or so years."

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Microsoft, Products, Revenue, Microsoft News