Windows Vista Interface Causes Problems For Consumers

Navigating Windows Vista's Aero user interface is a big problem for many consumers learning Microsoft's 6-month-old operating system, a technical support company said Thursday. Support.com, which offers technical support to consumers, said the top three reasons people called for Vista help were to solve navigation problems, device incompatibility, and home networking issues. While Vista is […]

Navigating Windows Vista's Aero user interface is a big problem for many consumers learning Microsoft's 6-month-old operating system, a technical support company said Thursday.

Support.com, which offers technical support to consumers, said the top three reasons people called for Vista help were to solve navigation problems, device incompatibility, and home networking issues.

While Vista is "a leap forward in terms of usability and functionality," it requires consumers used to working with older versions of Windows to learn something new, Anthony Rodio, chief marketing officer for Support.com, said in a statement. "We know very well that any major switch in operating systems can initially cause confusion and problems for end-users," he said. "Consumers often suffer from frustrating issues that prevent them from using their computer for its intended use, whether it's simply accessing their e-mail system or printing a document."

Among the top three problems, consumers had the most difficulty navigating Vista's new Aero user interface, Support.com said. The new interface caused confusion among consumers trying to locate files or operate basic functions.

Connecting devices, such as printers, MP3 players, and digital cameras, also is a problem, due mostly to outdated drivers, the tech support company said. The third biggest problem is in setting up home networks. Consumer had difficulty getting a Vista machine to see Windows XP computers running on the network.

Support.com offered some advice to Vista buyers. First is to make use of the OS's tutorial called "What's New In Windows Vista," which is located in the "Welcome Center" in the control panel.

To avoid device driver problems, people should visit device manufacturers' Web sites to see if updated drivers are available for Vista. Thirdly, to help with home networking, all third-party firewall software on XP computers should be temporarily disabled, as well as the "guest" account on the XP machine.

While many businesses have delayed Vista deployments, preferring to wait for Microsoft to fix the inevitable kinks in new software, consumer sales have been strong, primarily because new PCs ship only with Vista.

Source:? InformationWeek

Microsoft, Windows Vista, Vista Interface, Vista News