Windows Vista SP1 will fix critical ReadyBoost performance bug

A day prior to Mary Jo Foley's report on the mid-July release date for the beta of Vista SP1, a Microsoft employee silently outlined a critical flaw in Windows Vista's ReadyBoost feature and mentioned SP1 would include the fix - a rare occasion under the new Sinofsky administration. Robert Hensing, a security engineer at Microsoft, […]

A day prior to Mary Jo Foley's report on the mid-July release date for the beta of Vista SP1, a Microsoft employee silently outlined a critical flaw in Windows Vista’s ReadyBoost feature and mentioned SP1 would include the fix - a rare occasion under the new Sinofsky administration.

Robert Hensing, a security engineer at Microsoft, wrote on his blog about a performance flaw in ReadyBoost which severely hindered the responsiveness after resuming from standby (S3) or hibernate (S4) due to an architectural bug. The problem causes irregular and unnecessary hard-disk thrashing after resume which can take up to 8 minutes to settle down - ironically the outcome is the exact opposite of ReadyBoost’s purpose to increase responsiveness by caching. The cause is a simple yet stupid oversight in the design of ReadyBoost’s security system which encrypts all cache-data with an AES-128 encryption key, a great idea badly implemented.

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Microsoft, Windows Vista, SP1, Service Pack 1, Security, Fix, Update, Patch, ReadyBoost Performance, Bug, Vista News