Real World DirectX 10 Performance: It Ain't Pretty

With the first three DX10 games out there in the wild, we wanted to take a close look at what we can expect from the first generation of titles built around the new API. When it was drafted, DirectX 10 promised to once again change the way developers approach real-time 3D graphics programming. Not only […]

With the first three DX10 games out there in the wild, we wanted to take a close look at what we can expect from the first generation of titles built around the new API.

When it was drafted, DirectX 10 promised to once again change the way developers approach real-time 3D graphics programming. Not only would graphics hardware be capable of executing short custom programs (called shaders) on vertices and fragments (pixels), but developers would be able to move much more high-level polygon work to the GPU through geometry shaders. Pulling polygon level manipulation off the CPU opens up a whole host of possibilities to the developer.

With adequate performance, many of the geometric details simulated through other techniques could be applied in simple, straightforward ways involving less overhead. Techniques like normal mapping, parallax occlusion mapping, and many others exist solely for generating the illusion of additional geometry. Ever wonder why a face can be incredibly detailed while the silhouette of the same head looks more like a stop sign than a melon? This is because modern real-time 3D relies on low polygon models augmented with pixel level "tricks" to make up for it.

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DirectX10, DX10, Performance, Optimization