30% Of Businesses Have No Plans To Upgrade To Windows Vista

In the latest sign that Microsoft's Windows Vista operating system may be destined for less than overwhelming commercial success, a new InformationWeek survey has found that nearly one third of businesses do not plan on upgrading their computers to the much-hyped software. Tech professionals at the businesses surveyed were asked the following question: "When, if […]

In the latest sign that Microsoft's Windows Vista operating system may be destined for less than overwhelming commercial success, a new InformationWeek survey has found that nearly one third of businesses do not plan on upgrading their computers to the much-hyped software.

Tech professionals at the businesses surveyed were asked the following question: "When, if ever, does your company plan to purchase and install Windows Vista?"

One quarter of the 612 survey respondents said they were already using the new OS; 13% said they would do so in the next 12 months, while 27% said their companies would adopt Windows Vista more than one year from now.

But in what will surely be viewed as disappointing news at Microsoft headquarters in Redmond, WA, a full 30% of those surveyed said they had no plans to upgrade their systems to Windows Vista -- not ever.

"While security enhancements remain the primary reason for companies to adopt Windows Vista, concerns about compatibility and cost are still out there," wrote survey author Lisa Smith, InformationWeek's managing editor for research.

Indeed, Windows Vista compatibility issues are causing numerous headaches for Microsoft and its tech industry partners.

A number of major federal agencies, including NASA, the U.S. Department of Transportation, and the Federal Aviation Administration, have all decided to forego -- at least for now -- moving their desktop systems from Windows XP to Windows Vista, in part because some of their current business applications won't function properly on the OS.

Some prestigious universities, such as MIT and Stanford, have also shelved Windows Vista upgrades until compatibility issues can be resolved.

Meanwhile, consumer demand for Windows XP -- Windows Vista's predecessor -- recently forced computer maker Dell to reintroduce the older Microsoft operating system as an option on its home systems.

View: Full post

microsoft, windows vista, survey, survey result