Windows Stack Changes Boost Network Performance

The next release of Windows Server, code-named Longhorn, will bring a number of TCP-related improvements to the Windows platform. Enhancements to the network stack, like receive-side-window autotuning and the Compound TCP algorithm, will increase network performance. But upgrading to any new system brings some pain. Before you deploy Longhorn, or even Vista, have a clear […]

The next release of Windows Server, code-named Longhorn, will bring a number of TCP-related improvements to the Windows platform. Enhancements to the network stack, like receive-side-window autotuning and the Compound TCP algorithm, will increase network performance. But upgrading to any new system brings some pain. Before you deploy Longhorn, or even Vista, have a clear understanding of the impact these modifications will have on your network.

Besides network stack enhancements, Longhorn's management features bring efficiencies. Group Policy-based QoS (quality of service), for instance, will let you manage Windows bandwidth consumption. And IPv6, already available for previous versions of Windows, is installed and enabled by default. However, these changes to the TCP stack affect network performance.

View: Full post

Microsoft, Windows Server, Longhorn, TCP, Network Performance