Managing Windows Vista Application Compatibility

As of the end of March, 2007, 129 applications were certified or designed for Windows Vista, and 922 applications worked or were compatible with Windows Vista. Think that's a lot? Well, it does add up to over 1,000 applications you can run on Windows Vista with few, if any, issues. But, given that there are […]

As of the end of March, 2007, 129 applications were certified or designed for Windows Vista, and 922 applications worked or were compatible with Windows Vista. Think that's a lot? Well, it does add up to over 1,000 applications you can run on Windows Vista with few, if any, issues. But, given that there are tens of thousands of applications designed for Windows, this first thousand is just a drop in the bucket.

Making existing applications work for Vista is a big job. Microsoft is keeping track of each application that passes its bar and is providing weekly updates through its Knowledge Base. But this obviously doesn't suit everyone.

Take, for example, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), part of the Department of Commerce, which has decided to ban Windows Vista -- for now -- from its internal computing networks. Or the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Federal Aviation Administration, both of which have also decided to impose a temporary blackout on Windows Vista.

Besides grabbing attention, such a ban puts a focus on Vista's support of current and legacy applications. Vista contains a series of changes in the way it supports applications (after all, Microsoft performed a rewrite of all the Windows code for Vista). In some cases, these changes are system-wide -- in others they affect specific areas of application operation. In both cases, they can break applications.

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Microsoft, Windows Vista, Knowledgebase, How To, Manage, Managing, Application, Compatibility