Cursor Flaw Was Used By Hacker To Steal WoW Accounts

Those mischievous hackers have found an inventive new way to attack players of Blizzard's popular World of Warcraft MMORPG, exploiting flaws in the way MS Windows handles cursors in order to steal account details. According to a new report from the BBC, the attacks were first noticed late last month, with hackers taking control of […]

Those mischievous hackers have found an inventive new way to attack players of Blizzard's popular World of Warcraft MMORPG, exploiting flaws in the way MS Windows handles cursors in order to steal account details.

According to a new report from the BBC, the attacks were first noticed late last month, with hackers taking control of victims' PCs via rigged websites. According to the report, World of Warcraft was targeted owing to the vast sums of money now associated with the game. A patch closing this loophole has now been released by Microsoft.

While some websites slyly installing hackers' files on a host PC have been deliberately created, other sites have reportedly been hacked in order to spread the tools allowing the hackers to gain control. A group of Chinese hackers apparently used the cursor flaw in February to attack the Super Bowl website and use it as a vehicle for their spyware. The spyware lay dormant on a users PC until WoW was launched, at which point login details were sent back to the hacking group.

Research from firms like Symantec suggests that the value of a stolen WoW account is now higher on illegal markets than that of a credit card. Cards fetch in the region of 6 USD, while a World of Warcraft account currently commands 10 USD.

WoW gamers concerned by this threat should check they have now installed Microsoft's patch fixing the cursor bug.

Source:→ play.tm

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