The Windows Vista Incapable WoW

Microsoft poured a $1.64 billion deferral in the technology guarantee programs associated with Windows Vista and the 2007 Microsoft Office that were made public all the way back in October 24, 2006. But the Windows Vista Capable and Premium Ready logos program might backfire. A class action suit has been filed against the Redmond Company […]

Microsoft poured a $1.64 billion deferral in the technology guarantee programs associated with Windows Vista and the 2007 Microsoft Office that were made public all the way back in October 24, 2006. But the Windows Vista Capable and Premium Ready logos program might backfire. A class action suit has been filed against the Redmond Company in Seattle alleging that Microsoft has engaged in deceptive marketing practices.

Both the Windows Capable and Premium Ready logos have been used to identify system configurations designed to run the core experiences delivered by Windows Vista. However, the machines labeled Premium Ready were reserved for a superior experience of the operating system.

Dianne Kelley of Camano Island is the disgruntled computer buyer on behalf of which the class action suit has been filed. Kelley accuses Microsoft of deceptive and unfair conduct in marketing and selling Windows Vista. The lawsuit is focused on Microsoft's alleged failure to make a clear distinction between Capable and Premium Ready machines, as a Windows Vista Capable PC is often limited to running only Home Basic. “All the 'wow' stuff that Microsoft is selling and marketing is present in (Windows Vista Home) Premium, but it's not present in Basic,