Inside the Windows Vista Kernel Part 2

Mark Russinovich writes: Last month, in the first installment of this three-part series, I looked at Windows Vista kernel enhancements in the areas of processes and I/O. This time I'll cover advances in the way Windows Vista manages memory, as well as major improvements to system startup, shutdown, and power management (Part 1). Every release […]

Mark Russinovich writes: Last month, in the first installment of this three-part series, I looked at Windows Vista kernel enhancements in the areas of processes and I/O.

This time I'll cover advances in the way Windows Vista manages memory, as well as major improvements to system startup, shutdown, and power management (Part 1).

Every release of Windows® improves scalability and performance, and Windows Vista™ is no different. The Windows Vista Memory Manager includes numerous enhancements, like more extensive use of lock-free synchronization techniques, finer-grained locking, tighter data-structure packing, larger paging I/Os, support for modern GPU memory architectures, and more efficient use of the hardware Translation Lookaside Buffer. Plus, Windows Vista memory management now offers dynamic address space allocation for the requirements of different workloads.

Four performance-enhancing features that use new technologies make their operating system debut on Windows Vista: SuperFetch, ReadyBoost, ReadyBoot, and ReadyDrive.

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Microsoft, Windows Vista, Kernel, Technical, Article