Xbox 360-Gesture-Based-Gameplay-Raving Rabbids

Given you own an Xbox 360 with a Vision camera, you're probably going to like what you're about to hear: Raving Rabbids is coming to you this March and among the 70 crazy games (plus some new ones exclusively for the 360), there will be a total of 37 games playable using the Vision camera. […]

Given you own an Xbox 360 with a Vision camera, you're probably going to like what you're about to hear: Raving Rabbids is coming to you this March and among the 70 crazy games (plus some new ones exclusively for the 360), there will be a total of 37 games playable using the Vision camera. It sounds a little odd yes, concerning the craziness occurring in some of the games (like Bunnies Don't Know How to Throw the Cow for instance), but I'm sure it's going to beat the hell out of Nintendo's famous motion sensitive gameplay.

Anyway, Rayman Raving Rabbids is the fourth major installment in the popular Rayman series, and was first launched as a title for Nintendo's Wii console. The game's development was led by Michel Ancel, the original creator of Rayman, at Ubisoft's Montpellier studio. There are two different modes of play in Raving Rabbids: Story Mode and Score Mode.

In Story Mode, the game follows fifteen days of Rayman's imprisonment. Rayman is faced each day with completing at least three trials, followed by one special 'boss trial', such as an FPS or a racing game. These are less likely to make use of the Vision camera. Completing trials earns Rayman plungers and given he accumulates enough, he can build a ladder up the edge of his jail cell and escape to freedom. Completing trials also earns Rayman different music and costumes. In Score Mode, players can repeat past trials in an attempt to improve ranking. Rayman can also change appearance. He can either have a punk, pop, rock, granny, gangsta or a goth image.

The mini-games are those likely to benefit from the “gesture-based-gameplay.