No interest? Then why do Vista questions roll in?

Last week's review of Windows Vista brought a slew of e-mail from readers with questions about the new operating system. Conventional wisdom said there wasn't much interest in Vista, but you wouldn't have known that from my e-mail inbox or our Web site traffic. Thanks largely to hits from Google News, it was the No. […]

Last week's review of Windows Vista brought a slew of e-mail from readers with questions about the new operating system.

Conventional wisdom said there wasn't much interest in Vista, but you wouldn't have known that from my e-mail inbox or our Web site traffic. Thanks largely to hits from Google News, it was the No. 1 story on chron.com the day it ran.

With that in mind, here are the most common questions I was asked about Vista from last week, and the answers:

• If I am upgrading a home PC, which version of Windows Vista should I buy?
This will largely depend on the hardware in your computer. If your system has the graphics-card muscle to handle Vista's new Aero Glass look (see last week's column for the minimum requirements at www.chron.com/vistareview), then start with Home Premium. If it has a TV-tuner card in it that Vista supports, you'll also want Home Premium, as it has the Media Center components in it.

If your PC doesn't have what it takes and can't be upgraded, then start with Home Basic. You can always bump up to a version with more features using Anytime Upgrade, which lets you unlock more features. You pay for the difference between versions at one of several sites and are issued a new product key. Pop in your original Vista DVD, type in the key and your operating system is upgraded without you having to buy a new disc or download anything.

Also look at the recommendations in the Windows Vista Upgrade Advisor. You can find out more about it in my story on getting ready for Vista at www.chron.com/vistaready.

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Micrsoft, Windows Vista