Google Removes Search Engine's Results

Google currently owns the most popular search engine on the Internet with millions of users looking for information through it every day. Because the search technology owns a huge database with links from the entire Internet, the Google employees are continuously trying to keep the results accurate without infringing any copyright or other term. There […]

Google currently owns the most popular search engine on the Internet with millions of users looking for information through it every day. Because the search technology owns a huge database with links from the entire Internet, the Google employees are continuously trying to keep the results accurate without infringing any copyright or other term. There are a lot of webmasters that are contacting the company to remove their website from the search engine's index or some pages infringe Google's terms of service, so it's obvious that employees must keep the results accurate and relevant.

Today, while I was searching for a fix to repair a problem encountered in the operating  system, I searched Google for “desktop right click lag”. The search engine returned useful links but, at the bottom of the page it was mentioned: “In response to a complaint we received under the US Digital Millennium Copyright Act, we have removed 1 result(s) from this page. If you wish, you may read the DMCA complaint that caused the removal(s) at ChillingEffects.org.”

Because I wanted to find more information about the notification, I visited the Chilling Effect link provided by Google but the result was unexpected: “Notice Unvailable”. I decided to search Google for more information and I found this useful Google link that provides more information about the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

“It is our policy to respond to clear notices of alleged copyright infringement. This page describes the information that should be present in these notices. It is designed to make submitting notices of alleged infringement to Google as straightforward as possible while reducing the number of notices that we receive that are fraudulent or difficult to understand or verify. The form of notice specified below is consistent with the form suggested by the United States Digital Millennium Copyright Act (the text of which can be found at the U.S. Copyright Office Web Site, but we will respond to notices of this form from other jurisdictions as well,” Google sustains on the website.

The page also contains information about an infringement notification that can be sent to Google so, if you want to contact the company regarding this matter you should check this site.

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Google, Search Engine