Microsoft Relaxed User Account Control

The final version of the User Account Control that made its way into Windows Vista is in fact a relaxed variant. While UAC has gotten its fare share of criticism for being to chatty for the frequency of users prompts, Microsoft's original design was much worse. Initially, Windows Vista prompted the user for administrative authorization […]

The final version of the User Account Control that made its way into Windows Vista is in fact a relaxed variant. While UAC has gotten its fare share of criticism for being to chatty for the frequency of users prompts, Microsoft's original design was much worse.

Initially, Windows Vista prompted the user for administrative authorization in order to perform actions with elevated privileges. “When we first designed this functionality in Windows Vista, we required that the user enter the CONTROL-ALT-DELETE (C-A-D) sequence (known as a secure attention sequence due to its capability to resist interception) prior to prompting the administrator for their username and password,