Enterprise 2.0: Ten Predictions for 2007

The demand side of Enterprise 2.0 seems to be driven from a variety of sources that likely include a "long tail" of demand for on-the-fly IT solutions as well as the promise of enabling high value, collaborative problem solving (tacit interactions). But is the real story more complicated than a couple of causal roots? As […]

The demand side of Enterprise 2.0 seems to be driven from a variety of sources that likely include a "long tail" of demand for on-the-fly IT solutions as well as the promise of enabling high value, collaborative problem solving (tacit interactions). But is the real story more complicated than a couple of causal roots?

As it turns out, it's precisely this particular sweet spot that makes Enterprise 2.0 so interesting: Enterprise 2.0 platforms can provide highly general purpose, freeform, do-it-yourself (DIY) tools that have the potential to solve an entire group of related and overlapping problems in collaboration, knowledge management, SOA adoption, self-service IT, and even overall worker productivity that have been plaguing IT and business for years.

It doesn't hurt that Enterprise 2.0 has been modeled after what seems to be working so well on the Web these days. Consequently, Enterprise 2.0 is largely driven by the apparent large-scale success of simple, effective software models out on the World Wide Web including the power inherent in fully leveraging the output potential of the users of IT systems via social media, as demonstrated by Web 2.0 applications on the Internet from Flickr, YouTube, del.icio.us, and hundreds of others.

But web applications like blogs and wikis are just the beginning of the Enterprise 2.0 story and many other types of applications can be created out of the patterns and practices outlined by McAfee's SLATES capabilities model (search, linking, authoring, tagging, extensions, and signals). Unlike telephone, e-mail, and even instant messaging, the information and collaboration captured by Enterprise 2.0 apps is non-interruptive and highly leveragable since day-by-day interaction by users contially nuleaves discoverable artifacts behind that reflect the ideas and work conducted within business processes conducted under the aegis of these tools.

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Web 2.0, Enterprise, Predictions