The Problem With Syndicating Paid Search Ads

Richard Ball over at the Apogee Weblog has an interesting post this week that looks into the relationship that Google AdWords has with partner sites. He writes —I've given Google the benefit of the doubt when it comes to click fraud. Over the past year or so, whenever a sensational article concerning click fraud crops up, […]
Richard Ball over at the Apogee Weblog has an interesting post this week that looks into the relationship that Google AdWords has with partner sites. He writes —I've given Google the benefit of the doubt when it comes to click fraud. Over the past year or so, whenever a sensational article concerning click fraud crops up, I've argued that it's largely up to the advertisers to manage their PPC accounts to minimize click fraud. Google's been claiming that only a small fraction of its traffic is invalid. Over the past few days, I'm seeing as much as 40% of the traffic for a client account coming from bogus sites. This account is structured to only display ads on Google and its Search network. The Content network is turned off. All of the fraudulent traffic is coming from a single domain: searchportal.information.com. Tracking the traffic via log files, I'm seeing some rather disturbing trends. Google talks about how good its click fraud prevention algorithms are and how diligent they are about not charging advertisers for clicks. I'm not seeing that. I'm seeing one of Google's "Adsense for Domains" partners cheating my client. I've been aware of Google's parked domain program for awhile, but until now, none of my clients have been adversely affected. Note that in answering the question "Will my ads show on parked domain sites?", Google says:

Depending on the design of the site, a parked domain site will be classified as either a search site or a content site. That means your ads may show on parked domain sites if your campaign is opted in to the search or content networks.

Continue to read full article....

SE Guide

Advertising, Marketing, AdSense, Click Fraud, Google, google adwords, domain parking, content ads, search network, search engine, ppc advertising, pay per click