Not Quite Y2K, but Glitches Loom with '07 Daylight-Saving Change

Sounding a little like the Y2K concerns at the turn of this century, the U.S. Congress's expansion of daylight-saving time, which moves the clock change from early April to March 11, may cause some VARs to lose a little sleep.The change will require patches for many software products, some which will require manual installations. But […]

Sounding a little like the Y2K concerns at the turn of this century, the U.S. Congress's expansion of daylight-saving time, which moves the clock change from early April to March 11, may cause some VARs to lose a little sleep.The change will require patches for many software products, some which will require manual installations. But customers shouldn't expect VARs to be pushing such patches very hard.

"People will wait and see what will really happen because of Y2K," said Jim Locke, president of JWLocke and Associates, a VAR based in Pasadena, Calif. "Everybody shouted that the world was going to come to an end with Y2K, and of course it didn't."Click here to read about what can be learned from Y2K.But in spite of the negative connotations that may automatically go along with the daylight-saving time issue, Locke believes that it will indeed be an issue, and one that will most likely be handled through remediation rather than proactive efforts.

"It's hard for VARs to be proactive with this because of skepticism brought about by the Y2K experience," Locke said. "There has to be a rallying cry by vendors that this will be a major issue before you see VARs go ahead and do something about it."In some cases, users won't have to do anything. Much software deployed today will be automatically updated. For example, Microsoft's Windows XP (SP2), Windows Server 2003, Windows Server SP1 will receive patches via automatic updates, according to a Microsoft Web page that provides an overview of products affected by the change and whether or not they are supported.

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Y2K, Daylight, Saving, 2007