Build an Ajax application using Google Web Toolkit, Apache Derby, and Eclipse, Part 1: The fancy front end

IBM developerWorks posted the first tutorial on their site introducing “AJAX application development using Google Web Toolkit and Apache Derby”. In this first part, Noel Rappin, Senior Software Engineer, Motorola, focuses on to set up GWT and create a simple client interface that responds to user actions. Google Web Toolkit (GWT) is a major step forward in […]

IBM developerWorks posted the first tutorial on their site introducing “AJAX application development using Google Web Toolkit and Apache Derby”. In this first part, Noel Rappin, Senior Software Engineer, Motorola, focuses on to set up GWT and create a simple client interface that responds to user actions.

Google Web Toolkit (GWT) is a major step forward in the creation of dynamic Java™Script applications that run in users' Web browsers. Using GWT, developers can design the user interface (UI) and event model using familiar Java techniques while GWT does the hard work of making the code friendly for all the major browsers. Learn the basics of GWT in this first article in a series, including how GWT lets you create an Asynchronous JavaScript + XML (Ajax) application and still write your code in the Java language. Discover how to create and run a small sample GWT application -- a hot new Web 2.0 business called Slicr, which sells pizza online.

GWT makes building a rich Ajax browser client interface even easier than building traditional Java GUI interfaces. As fabulous as GWT is, however, it can't create an entire Web application by itself. You must still have a data store on the server and some kind of framework for converting that data into Java objects that GWT can pass from the server to its client. In this series of articles, you'll use Apache Derby, a 100% pure Java database that you can embed in the same Java Virtual Machine (JVM) as the rest of your server-side code.

With GWT, you can develop Ajax applications in the Java programming language. The hallmark of an Ajax application is a rich, interactive environment more often associated with traditional UI applications. Figure 1 shows a sample GWT interface that mimics a desktop e-mail application. This demo is visible at the GWT Web site.

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Build an Ajax application using Google Web Toolkit, Apache Derby, and Eclipse, Part 1: The fancy front end